Welsh Candidate Study

I conduct the Welsh Candidate Study to collect information about candidates who stand at the National Assembly for Wales elections. This project entails running a post-election survey among candidates who seek to become Assembly Members, asking a variety of question about their political background, campaign choices, and political views. It provides further transparency about devolved campaigns in Wales, who the candidates standing for election are and what they believe in.

2021 Welsh Candidate Study

I intend to conduct a survey of candidates who stand at the 2021 National Assembly for Wales election on May 6th 2021. The questionnaire will include many questions that were used in the 2016 Welsh Election Study to allow for over-time comparisons of campaign practices and political attitudes, but I am open to including new questions to the 2021 Welsh Candidate Study. 

If you want to propose questions for the 2021 Welsh Candidate Study, please get in touch!

2016 Welsh Candidate Study

I was the Principal Investigator for the 2016 Welsh Candidate Study. It was conducted to collect information on candidates who stood at the 2016 National Assembly for Wales election, featuring questions on their candidacy, campaign practices, policy positions, attitudes towards representation, and personal background. The questionnaire has overlap with the voter survey component of the 2016 Welsh Election Study.

Documentation

Survey questionnaire in English and Welsh.

Data

Survey data will be made available as part of the "Out of touch and out of time?" project.

Bibliography

2020: Trumm, S. "Explaining support for Brexit among parliamentary candidates: The case of Wales". British Politics, OnlineFirst. [link] [manuscript]

 

2018: Trumm, S. "The best of both worlds? Evaluating the campaign behaviour of dual candidates". Electoral Studies, 56: 14-22. [link] [post-print manuscript]

2018: Trumm, S. "Representation in Wales: An empirical analysis of the policy divisions between voters and candidates". The British Journal of Politics and International Relations, 20(2): 425-440. [link] [post-print manuscript]